Harlem Week 2011 Kicks Off

 

Harlem Week 2011 Kicks Off

August 1, 2011 1:55pm | By Jeff Mays, DNAinfo Reporter/Producer

 

Harlem Week 2011 is underway. (flickr/Smilingii)

HARLEM — It’s called Harlem Week, but the events stretch well beyond a month.

When the festival first started in 1974, it became so popular that more days were added. It’s name, however, remained the same.

“Only in Harlem can you have a week that lasts a month to 45 days,” said Harlem Week vice-chairman Marko Nobles.

“It’s always been about showcasing the importance and greatness of the Harlem community and showing why Harlem is one of most recognized neighborhoods in the world,” he added.

This year’s festival is no exception. With everything from dance parties in the street to an auto show and a 5K race, organizers said the 2011 festival is better than ever.

“There’s something for everybody, including events for children, an auto show and even sporting events,” said Nobles.

Among the highlights, includes Thursday’s kickoff with the New York City Economic Development Seminar Lunch and Exposition at Columbia University’s Lerner Hall at 115th and Broadway.

On Aug. 9, a senior citizens “Elder Jubilee” will be held at the State Office Building starting at 10 a.m. at 163 W. 125th Street.

More than 50 black colleges and universities will descend on West 135th Street between Lenox Avenue and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard on Saturday, Aug. 20 during the Black College Fair.

Harlem Day on Aug. 21 will be one of the event’s highlights. A children’s festival at the P.S. 175 schoolyard, along with an automobile show featuring new, vintage and exotic vehicles will be held on West 135th between Lenox and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard.

“Harlem Day is the largest day of Harlem Week,”  said Nobles. “It is the day that started Harlem Week. There will be four stages of entertainment, live radio broadcasting, the Upper Manhattan Auto show and international performances that speak to the importance of celebrating our diversity.”
The day will also include a tribute to the victims of 9/11.

Aug. 27 is the Hon. Percy Sutton Harlem 5k Run and NYC Walk for the Health of the Children of Haiti. The event will help to raise money for the Harlem Healthy Eating and Living Initiative.

“With these events, we hope to showcase all of what Harlem is about,” Nobles said.

For a full listing of events, visit the Harlem Week website.

Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/20110801/harlem/harlem-week-2011-kicks-off?utm_content=blackcotton212%40gmail.com&utm_source=VerticalResponse&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=Harlem%20Week%202011%20Kicks%20Off&utm_campaign=Textile%20Arts%20Center%20Weaves%20Facebook-Free%20Funcontent#ixzz1Tu9qQBCo

Advertisements

Putting an Antebellum Myth to Rest

Clipped from www.nytimes.com

Putting an Antebellum Myth to Rest

By TERA W. HUNTER

Princeton, N.J.

WAS slavery an idyllic world of stable families headed by married parents? The recent controversy over “The Marriage Vow,” a document endorsed by the Republican presidential candidates Michele Bachmann and Rick Santorum, might seem like just another example of how racial politics and historical ignorance are perennial features of the election cycle.

The vow, which included the assertion that “a child born into slavery in 1860 was more likely to be raised by his mother and father in a two-parent household than was an African-American baby born after the election of the USA’s first African-American President,” was amended after the outrage it stirred.

However, this was not a harmless gaffe; it represents a resurfacing of a pro-slavery view of “family values” that was prevalent in the decades before the Civil War. The resurrection of this idea has particular resonance now, because it was 150 years ago, soon after the war began, that the government started to respect the dignity of slave families. Slaves did not live in independent “households”; they lived under the auspices of masters who controlled the terms of their most intimate relationships.

Back in 1860, marriage was a civil right and a legal contract, available only to free people. Male slaves had no paternal rights and female slaves were recognized as mothers only to the extent that their status doomed their children’s fate to servitude in perpetuity. To be sure, most slaves did all that they could to protect, sustain and nurture their loved ones. Freedom and the love of family are the most abiding themes that dominate the hundreds of published narratives written by former slaves.

Though slaves could not marry legally, they were allowed to do so by custom with the permission of their owners — and most did. But the wedding vows they recited promised not “until death do us part,” but “until distance” — or, as one black minister bluntly put it, “the white man” — “do us part.” And couples were not entitled to live under the same roof, as each spouse could have a different owner, miles apart. All slaves dealt with the threat of forcible separation; untold numbers experienced it first-hand.

Read more at www.nytimes.com

 

NEWLY CONSTRUCTED AFFORDABLE APARTMENTS FOR RENT IN THE MOTT HAVEN AND MORRISANIA SECTION OF THE BRONX

Housing Preservation and Development and Housing Development Corporation
spacer.gif
spacer.gif
August 2, 2011

NEWLY CONSTRUCTED AFFORDABLE APARTMENTS FOR RENT IN THE MOTT HAVEN AND MORRISANIA SECTION OF THE BRONX

JEMP Owners LLC is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for 36 affordable housing rental apartments under construction at 1434-1438 Morris Avenue, 720-722 East 161st Street and 748 Jackson Avenue in the Mott Haven and Morrisania section of the Bronx. These buildings are being constructed through the Low Income Rental Program (LIRP) of the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD).

For more information

spacer.gif

This is the NYC.gov News You Requested For:

Apartments and Homes for Rent or Sale

Comment on this news service

PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS MESSAGE!

mt?g=1.m99qs.n8ol.rs.0.lhqfb.-wyz88i

e8dc5472a706365bdc59199350ff8e1fworker.jpg